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African identities and international politics [electronic book] / Frank Aragbonfoh Abumere.

By: Abumere, Frank Aragbonfoh [author].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Routledge contemporary Africa series: Publisher: London: Routledge, 2022Copyright date: ©2022Description: online resource (176 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781032010014 (hardback); 9781032010014 (e-Book).Subject(s): National characteristics, African | World politics | Africa -- Foreign relationsDDC classification: 305.896 Online resources: e-Book
Contents:
Introduction (divisions, difference, identities and values) -- Geography, linguistic, racial and religious divisions and differences -- Identity politics and power relations -- Social contract and regulative principles -- A structuralist explanation of African international politics -- An African liberal regional order -- The order and justice dilemma in African international politics -- A constructivist view of African international politics -- Conclusion: political and economic consequences.
Summary: Using the lenses of realism, liberalism, the English School and constructivism, this book explains how the divisions and differences in African identities affect African international politics. This book explores the African condition in the twenty-first century. It analyses how geographical, racial, ethnic, linguistic, religious and power differences shape continental and intercontinental relations in Africa through the creation of identities and values which militate against intra-continental or regional relations. The author assesses inclusionary and exclusionary, rational and irrational relationships, interactions and non-interactions which occur between geographical, linguistic, racial and religious entities in Africa. He suggests that, in these moments, one entity will negatively relate, interact or refuse to interact with another entity for the gains of the former and to the detriment of the latter or even to the detriment of both entities. Divided into two parts, the first part of the book employs an ecumenical approach to discuss the divisions and differences that disunite Africa as a continent and Africans as a people and how they affect African international politics. Part II goes on to explore how this 'othering' can be superseded by non-discriminatory, unifying and positive identities and values. Examining the possibility of creating identities and values that can unite Africa as a continent and Africans as a people, this book will be of interest to scholars of African politics, international relations and political theory.
List(s) this item appears in: Sustainable Development Goals Collection
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
e-BOOK MTU Bishopstown Library eBook 305.896 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Not for loan
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Using the lenses of realism, liberalism, the English School and constructivism, this book explains how the divisions and differences in African identities affect African international politics.

This book explores the African condition in the twenty-first century. It analyses how geographical, racial, ethnic, linguistic, religious and power differences shape continental and intercontinental relations in Africa through the creation of identities and values which militate against intra-continental or regional relations. The author assesses inclusionary and exclusionary, rational and irrational relationships, interactions and non-interactions which occur between geographical, linguistic, racial and religious entities in Africa. He suggests that, in these moments, one entity will negatively relate, interact or refuse to interact with another entity for the gains of the former and to the detriment of the latter or even to the detriment of both entities. Divided into two parts, the first part of the book employs an ecumenical approach to discuss the divisions and differences that disunite Africa as a continent and Africans as a people and how they affect African international politics. Part II goes on to explore how this 'othering' can be superseded by non-discriminatory, unifying and positive identities and values.

Examining the possibility of creating identities and values that can unite Africa as a continent and Africans as a people, this book will be of interest to scholars of African politics, international relations and political theory.

The Open Access version of this book, available at http: //www.taylorfrancis.com, has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction (divisions, difference, identities and values) -- Geography, linguistic, racial and religious divisions and differences -- Identity politics and power relations -- Social contract and regulative principles -- A structuralist explanation of African international politics -- An African liberal regional order -- The order and justice dilemma in African international politics -- A constructivist view of African international politics -- Conclusion: political and economic consequences.

Using the lenses of realism, liberalism, the English School and constructivism, this book explains how the divisions and differences in African identities affect African international politics. This book explores the African condition in the twenty-first century. It analyses how geographical, racial, ethnic, linguistic, religious and power differences shape continental and intercontinental relations in Africa through the creation of identities and values which militate against intra-continental or regional relations. The author assesses inclusionary and exclusionary, rational and irrational relationships, interactions and non-interactions which occur between geographical, linguistic, racial and religious entities in Africa. He suggests that, in these moments, one entity will negatively relate, interact or refuse to interact with another entity for the gains of the former and to the detriment of the latter or even to the detriment of both entities. Divided into two parts, the first part of the book employs an ecumenical approach to discuss the divisions and differences that disunite Africa as a continent and Africans as a people and how they affect African international politics. Part II goes on to explore how this 'othering' can be superseded by non-discriminatory, unifying and positive identities and values. Examining the possibility of creating identities and values that can unite Africa as a continent and Africans as a people, this book will be of interest to scholars of African politics, international relations and political theory.

Electronic reproduction.: Knowledge Unlatched. Mode of access: World Wide Web.

Sustainable Development Goals Collection

Open Access

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frank Aragbonfoh Abumere is the Cmelikova Visiting International Scholar at the Jepson School of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond, USA.

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